Friday, August 19, 2016

Wanda's Picks Friday, August 19: "From the Archives features a show first aired: August 10, 2016"

This is a black arts and culture site. We will be exploring the African Diaspora via the writing, performance, both musical and theatrical (film and stage), as well as the visual arts of Africans in the Diaspora and those influenced by these aesthetic forms of expression. I am interested in the political and social ramifications of art on society, specifically movements supported by these artists and their forebearers. It is my claim that the artists are the true revolutionaries, their work honest and filled with raw unedited passion. They are our true heroes. Ashay!

Show link: 
http://tobtr.com/s/9157551

From the Archives features a show first aired: August 10, 2016.

We feature artists Ajuan Mance and Destiny Muhammad from the Black Woman Is God exhibit at SOMarts Gallery in San Francisco.

They are followed by an interview with CJ Jones (USA), http://www.cjjoneslive.com/, and Antoine Hunter (USA), curator, founder, Bay Area International Deaf Dance Festival.



Zaccho
Bandaloop




















We close with a conversation with Joanna Haigood, founder and choreographer, Zaccho Dance Company, and co-curator, with Christopher Wangro, of the Bay Area Ariel Arts Festival this weekend, 8/19-21 at Ft. Mason Center in San Francisco.


Featured choreographers: Amelia Rudolph, Bandaloop and Jodi Lomask, Capacitor, also join us: https://fortmason.org/event/the-san-francisco-aerial-arts-festival

Capacitor -- "Micah Waters" (RJ Luna, photographer)

Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Wanda's Picks Radio Wed., August 17, 2016 The Hon. Marcus Garvey Special


Honoring the Hon. Marcus Mosiah Garvey (8/17/1887-June 10/1940) on his birthday!

Guests: Dr. Oba T'Shaka, Brother Don Rico, Brother Gene Dinizulu Teenie, Sister Sheba Makeda Haven

Sister Sheba Makeda Haven is a former BPP member, artist and craftswoman, and African Orthodox Church Deaconess. As a deaconess I was one of the clergy invited by the UNIA to establish a charter in Northern California.  Thanks to Elder Freeman and his brother Roland, a charter and active membership was founded in Los Angeles.

Dr. T'Shaka is an activist's scholar, renowned public speaker, professor, workshop leader, author, organizer and visionary of exceptional influence who addresses audiences in the United States, Britain, France and Africa. For 38 years, Dr. T'Shaka was a Professor at San Francisco State University, where he is now Professor Emeritus (http://www.obatshaka.com/biography)

RAs Don Rico has been a community activist and organizer since his teens in the early 1960s, in Jamaica, as a co-founder of a youth club at the start of what became an island-wide Youth Club movement.

He has been an activist/motivator and organizer/mentor in various areas since:  youth clubs, sports and social clubs, trade unions, etc etc.  Now an elder in the Rastafari international community, RAs Don Rico has been an ardent Garveyite Pan-Afrikanist Rastafari organizer.

RAs Don is a graphic designer, painter, illustrator, poet, writer/diarist, public speaker, among other ‘content-producing-and-presenting' abilities. 

‘Head Cook and Bottle-Washer' for South Florida's Annual Marcus Garvey Celebrations Committee, which has been hosting the events since Mwalimu Marcus Garvey's Centenary since 1987.

The AMGBC (Annual Marcus Garvey Birthday Celebrations) includes two signature events; the Annual Marcus Garvey Lecture/Afrikan Community Forum (Aug.17), and LIONSPLASH: which is a Pan-Afrikan Birthday Bash, “Forward2School” Family Fun Day; KulchaConcert (Aug. 27). Both events are at Florida Memorial University Auditorium.


Dinizulu Gene Tinnie is a New York-born, Miami-based visual artist, writer, independent researcher, semi-retired educator, and activist in cultural arts, historic preservation, and social justice issues, with a formal academic background in foreign languages, linguistics, and literature. He is the Co-Director, with Mr. Harmon R. Carey of Wilmington, Delaware, of the Dos Amigos/Fair Rosamond Slave Ship Replica Project, and is active in creating a Middle Passage Coalition network and information clearinghouse for organizations and individuals engaged in Middle Passage history and heritage. Mr. Tinnie serves on several museum and historic preservation boards (http://www.cada.us/2015-panelists/).

Show Link: 
 http://www.blogtalkradio.com/wandas-picks/2016/08/17/wandas-picks-radio-show

Music: Zion Trinity's "Opening Prayer for Elegba"; Marcus Shelby's Soul of the Movement "We're a Winner."

Friday, August 05, 2016

Wanda's Picks Monday, August 8, 2016



This is a black arts and culture site. We will be exploring the African Diaspora via the writing, performance, both musical and theatrical (film and stage), as well as the visual arts of Africans in the Diaspora and those influenced by these aesthetic forms of expression. I am interested in the political and social ramifications of art on society, specifically movements supported by these artists and their forebearers. It is my claim that the artists are the true revolutionaries, their work honest and filled with raw unedited passion. They are our true heroes. Ashay!

This special broadcast features: Thomas Cokenias (Wyatt Cooke), Norman Gee (Eban Carter), and Danielle Thys (Emma Cooke), for Dominic Hoffman's "Emmitt & Ava," currently up at the Fireside Theatre and Beverly Hills Playhouse in San Francisco, Friday-Sunday, August 12-14. For tickets visit: www.bhpsanfrancisco.com

The Carter and Cooke families have both experienced recent losses. Eban's son, Emmitt and the Cooke's daughter, Ava have died. They were in a horrible car accident. The two victims are young, 19 and 20. The Cookes do not know Emmitt; however both Eban and his son, Evan, know Ava, Emmitt's girlfriend. Both Emmitt and Ava are visual artists, one black, the other partner, white. While race is certainly an element in the work, what is more explored is the nature of grief and loss and how one articulates this when it is still inexplicable. When Eban returns to the Cooke home after their daughter's funeral, he asks a favor. It is this favor that brings into the forefront, hidden prejudices and denial.

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/wandas-picks/2016/08/08/wandas-picks-radio-show

Wanda's Picks Friday, August 5, 2016

This is a black arts and culture site. We will be exploring the African Diaspora via the writing, performance, both musical and theatrical (film and stage), as well as the visual arts of Africans in the Diaspora and those influenced by these aesthetic forms of expression. I am interested in the political and social ramifications of art on society, specifically movements supported by these artists and their forebearers. It is my claim that the artists are the true revolutionaries, their work honest and filled with raw unedited passion. They are our true heroes. Ashay!

Show link: 
http://tobtr.com/9157535

1. We are joined by Antoine Hunter, founder, Urban Jazz Dance Company, and presenter and producer of the Annual Bay Area Deaf Dance Festival International. In its 4th year this season, Aug. 12-14, 2016 at Dance Mission Theatre in San Francisco. He is joined in the studio by Zahna Simon, Assist. Dir. UJDC and BADDF. Fred Beam, Wild Zappers from Washington, DC, and Isolte Avila, Sign Dance Collective International Collaborations Director, to talk about this year's programming which includes an artist meet and greet (8/13, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.) and Dance Workshops, Wed., Aug. 10, 6-10 p.m. Both events are at the Deaf Community Center, 1550 San Leandro Blvd., San Leandro).

Tickets are available at http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/2561054.

2. Patricia Milton joins us to talk about her play, "Hearts of Palm," extended through Aug. 21 at Central Works (Berkeley City Club on Durant Street). The satire looks at the politics of food production: trans fat, palm oil, Girl Scout cookies and orangutans. Visit ​http://centralworks.org/season/

Milton’s plays have been performed in New York, Boston, Istanbul, San Francisco, and places in between. Her values are: Laughter, candor, artistic excellence, determination, integrity, generosity, and feminism. She is a Resident Playwright at Central Works in Berkeley, CA.

Music: Zion Trinity's Opening Prayer for Elegba; KebMo's "What's Happening Brother"; Howard Wiley's "Amazing Grace"; Sweet Honey in the Rock's "Greed." 


Wednesday, August 03, 2016

Wanda's Picks Radio, Wed., August 3, 2016

This is a black arts and culture site. We will be exploring the African Diaspora via the writing, performance, both musical and theatrical (film and stage), as well as the visual arts of Africans in the Diaspora and those influenced by these aesthetic forms of expression. I am interested in the political and social ramifications of art on society, specifically movements supported by these artists and their forebearers. It is my claim that the artists are the true revolutionaries, their work honest and filled with raw unedited passion. They are our true heroes. Ashay!

1. Aundrea Lacy, born and raised in San Francisco, has been a model, a television journalist, and a marketing executive for Fortune 500 companies. She earned her MBA from Golden State University. In 1996, she went from baking brownies for friends to building her own online bakery business, Luv Brownies. In addition, she gives career presentations for girls and women from around the country.

Lacy established Luv's Brownies in October 1996, first preparing her delicious morsels in her apartment—then in a professional kitchen as sales drew exponentially. The treats are sold through
Lacy's Internet bakery and shipped nationwide. Luv's Brownies are prepared in more than 20 savory flavors including rocky road, peanut butter brownie s’more, coconut caramel, mint chip and more.

Luv's Brownies founder is the author of two books. Lacy's first book "Luv Story: From Homemade Brownies to My Own Internet Bakery" is a resource for anyone who desires to start their own small business. In "Luv Story" Lacy shares real life experiences, including how she kept her company thriving through an economic downturn and her personal life crises. "Luv Story: From Homemade Brownies to My Own Internet Bakery" sold more than 30,000 copies.

Lacy's second literary offering, "Brownie Points: Lessons for Woman Entrepreneurs from One Who Made It," is a greatly expanded version of "Luv Story," one which answers the many questions she had been asked on her speaking engagements by girls and women who were considering starting their own business. Without changing her simple and straightforward style, she went into detail on how to write a business plan, bookkeeping; marketing and much more. Visit luvsbrownies.com

2. We close with an interview with Thomas Simpson, AfroSolo founder, who will speak about the August 2016 season which opens with a free concert at Yerba Buena Gardens, in San Francisco,
Ms. Tammy Hall and Dr. Linda Ricketts, both featured at the
AfroSolo 2016 Concert at YBCA
Mission @ Third Streets, this Sat., August 6, 1-3 p.m. Featured are two artists and their ensembles, Ms. Tammy Hall and Dr. Linda Ricketts. Dr. Ricketts will join us this morning.


Linda Ricketts is a vocalist who began performing at age 15 with a classical vocal ensemble, and has been involved in the performing arts ever since. Born and raised in the Midwest, Linda co-founded a Caribbean Dance & Folklore Company in Indianapolis, Indiana, and co-founded the ‘Black & White & Dread All Over’ Puppet Company of St. Thomas, in the U.S. Virgin Islands. After moving to the Bay Area in the mid 1980’s, Linda worked closely with local jazz artists to create The ‘Oakland Bay Area Jazz Preservation Society’, a non profit organization dedicated to preserving jazz music by offering programs in the public schools of Oakland and San Francisco, and in after school music programs for children in the Greater Bay Area.
In 1988 she founded an Oakland based performing arts group, ‘The Gospel Theatre Ensemble.’
Linda is an experienced studio artist. She has recorded at Skywalker Ranch with the Oakland Interfaith Gospel Choir (OIGC) on Linda Rondstadt’s Grammy winning Cry Like a Rainstorm, soloed on OIGC’s debut recording, and has provided background vocals on several studio projects. She is a frequent soloist at special events and at jazz and dinner spots here in the San Francisco Bay Area. Linda frequently appears on various venues in cities across the country stylizing ballads, blues, spirituals and jazz in a fashion uniquely suited for the deep resonance of her contralto voice.
Known to many as Ricketti Rick, Linda has shared the stage with such local and nationally acclaimed artists as, Pharaoh Sanders, Ricardo Scales, William Bell, Ed Kelley, John Turk, Rhonda Benin, Robert Stewart, Willis Kirk, The Neville Brothers, Jackie Hairston and many others. She was recently featured at the Throckmorton Theatre in northern California with The Friends of The Negro Spirituals.
Linda regularly sings with the Allen Temple Baptist Church Choirs in Oakland, and has performed in a variety of venues in the U.S., France, Japan, Mexico, and Africa. A professional speaker and Education & Training consultant, Dr. Linda Ricketts delivers music that fuels the spirit and feeds the soul.

Thomas Simpson Bio
 (from website)

Thomas Robert Simpson, actor, director, producer, and writer, is the founder and artistic director of AfroSolo Arts Festival. Since 1991 he has concentrated on presenting African American and African Diasporan art and culture through solo performances and the visual and literary arts.

For the past seventeen years Mr. Simpson has produced the award winning and critically acclaimed AfroSolo Arts Festival in San Francisco, presenting over seventy-five artists. He has also showcased celebrity artists such as award-winning actor Ruby Dee, comedian and political activist Dick Gregory, beloved teacher, poet and social activist June Jordan, sensational black gospel singer Emmit Powell, and many others.

In 2006 Mr. Simpson won a coveted Bay Area Jefferson Award for Public Service. In 2009 he was awarded a prestigious Certificate of Honor from the San Francisco Board of Supervisor, as well as award from San Francisco AIDS Foundation’s Black Brothers Esteem Program, The Reggie Williams Achievement Award and the Oakland Supper Club for his contributions to our community.

Since 1999 Mr. Simpson has also used this Arts Festival to focus on the health of African Americans, he has collaborating with the medical community to present health fairs as well as sat on committees charged with decreasing the health disparity in the African American community.


Link to show: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/wandas-picks/2016/08/03/wandas-picks-radio-show

Friday, July 22, 2016

Wanda's Picks Friday, July 22, 2016

This is a black arts and culture site. We will be exploring the African Diaspora via the writing, performance, both musical and theatrical (film and stage), as well as the visual arts of Africans in the Diaspora and those influenced by these aesthetic forms of expression. I am interested in the political and social ramifications of art on society, specifically movements supported by these artists and their forebearers. It is my claim that the artists are the true revolutionaries, their work honest and filled with raw unedited passion. They are our true heroes. Ashay!

1. We speak to Andrew P. Saito and Amy Muller about the 39th Annual Bay Area Playwright's Festival closing this weekend, 7/22-24 at Custom Made Theatre in SF. 
Bios:
Amy Mueller (Artistic Director) is an award-winning director. Since taking the helm of Playwrights Foundation ten years ago she has transformed the scope of the organization into a year-round center for new plays and playwrights. Recent credits include: ...and Jesus Moonwalks the Mississippi by Marcus Gardley, One Big Lie by Liz Duffy Adams (dramaturg), Mr. Fujiyama's Electric Beach by Kevin Oakes (dramaturg), and co-creator of The Mandala Olive Project at the Exit Theatre. Director: Voices Under Water by Abi Basch, Between The Eyesby Naomi Wallace and No Good Deed by Mollena Williams. She has directed at Cutting Ball Theater, Berkeley Rep, San Diego Rep, A.C.T. Seattle and Arizona Theatre Company. She is the mother of two beautiful children.


Andrew P. Saito's plays include La Lechera, El Rio, finalist for the Princess Grace Award, Krispy Kritters in the Scarlett Night, featured at Cutting Ball Theater's 2011 Risk Is This...Festival, and The Patron Saint of Monsters, selected for a 2012 Core Apprentice developmental reading at the Playwrights Center of Minneapolis. Other presenters include the Bay Area Playwrights Festival, Brava! for Women in the Arts, Kearny Street Workshop, Asian American Theatre Company, La Pena Cultural Center, and Mixed Phoenix Theatre Company in New York. He has been twice commissioned by Handful Players, and has taught playwriting in rural Mayan villages in Guatemala, and with WritersCorps, Performing Arts Workshop, legendary Peruvian theatre collective Yuyachkani, and Montalvo Arts Center as a Teaching Artist Fellow. A two-time alternate for a Fulbright Fellowship in Creative Writing, as well finalist for as a Jerome Playwriting Fellowship, Andrew is a proud founding member of Cut the Rhino, a 5-member theatre collective formed by the 2011 graduating class of the Iowa Playwrights Workshop.

From the Archives:

2. Tania Santiago, dir. Arguas (Feb. 2014)

3. Tarell Alvin Craney re: Head Passes@ BRT (2015)

Music: Zion Trinity; Nova Lima

Visit: 
http://tobtr.com/s/9088397

Friday, July 01, 2016

Wanda's Picks Friday, July 1

This is a black arts and culture site. We will be exploring the African Diaspora via the writing, performance, both musical and theatrical (film and stage), as well as the visual arts of Africans in the Diaspora and those influenced by these aesthetic forms of expression. I am interested in the political and social ramifications of art on society, specifically movements supported by these artists and their forebearers. It is my claim that the artists are the true revolutionaries, their work honest and filled with raw unedited passion. They are our true heroes. Ashay! 

1. From the archives: "Grateful" -- Victoria Theodore (4/26/2013)

2. Velina Brown joins us to talk about "Schooled," SF Mime Troupe's 2016 Summer Season opening July 2-3, 1:30 p.m. in Berkeley at Cedar Rose Park and 7/4 Dolores Park in San Francisco.

Velina Brown (Lavinia Jones, mother),
Rotimi Agbabiaka
 (Thomas Jones, son)
Bio:

Velina Brown (Actor, SFMT Collective) has been a principal performer for the Mime Troupe in such shows as City for Sale, Eating It, 1600 Transylvania Avenue, Mr. Smith Goes to Obscuristan, and Showdown at Crawford Gulch to name a few. She was the Devil in Deal With the Devil, Veronique in Veronique of the Mounties, she's played Condoleeza Rice three times, and was both an actor and Contributing Lyricist on GodFellas and Making a Killing. Velina's most recent shows with the Troupe include Ripple Effect, For The Greater Good: Or the Last Election, Red State, Too Big to Fail, and Posibilidad: Or Death of the Worker for which she won Best Principal Actress by the Bay Area Critics Circle. In 2012 she was honored as one of TBA's "35 Faces", artists who've made significant contributions to the Bay Area theater community.

Mother and Son with Keiko Shimosato-Carreiro (Ethel Orocuru)




Music: Zion Trinity's Elegba Opening Prayer; Victoria Theodore's "Grateful," Rene Marie's Star Spangled Banner/Lift Every Voice 


http://www.michaelgenesullivan.com/

Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Critical Thinking in Alameda


Mekdes and Jessica on "Police Brutality"
Today was the final day of classes at the College of Alameda. I started the day at 4:30 in the morning and still found myself dashing to school with little time to spare. I was excited to see what my English 5 or Critical Thinking students had prepared for the Educational Forum on Current Issues. It was our second Forum in two semesters and this class focused on Marriage Equality, Food Issues: Obesity, Food Deserts and GMOs; College Costs and Police Brutality.

Peter and Tesfalidet, "Obesity"
Ruitao and Romeo, "Food Deserts"


The presentations were outstanding—I’d read most if not all their arguments—Toulmin, Aristotelian, Rogerian and Definition.  This semester and last the final exam was given in three parts: written, orals, and community forum. To prepare, student scholars annotated bibliographies and identified fallacious arguments; they read multiple topical arguments then reduced them to standard form. They were advised to stay current on their issue by paying attention to local, national and global news. Students also rehearsed arguments and watched and listened to classmates present in class on other topics such as Beyoncé’s performance at Super Bowl 50; Dr. Bennet Omalu on the dangers of football in Concussion, staring Will Smith (as Omalu), and the merits of integration for educational equity in an NPR program, This American Life where reporter, Nikole Hannah-Jones, looks at public education in Normandy, which has one high school, the one that Michael Brown attended at graduated. Normandy borders Ferguson, Missouri.

Alan and Anna, "College Costs"







As guests mingled Tuesday morning, we were all sort of drawn to the presentation at the College Costs table. Alan had a computer program which would tell one how many years it would take to pay off a loan if it knew the amount.  He and Anna’s poster had multiple cartoons with illustrations of the debt college cost were in proportion to graduate income.



Vincent and Stewart, "Climate Change"





At the Climate Change table, Vincent and Stewart advocated for using less carbon fuel to decrease the effects of heating up the earth’s atmosphere, while Stewart shared how global warming affected our food supply with the reduction of insects who pollinate plants. He links his issue to that of GMOs and food supply reduction.

Abby and Riley, "Marriage Equality"
Our next presenters were Abby and Riley: their topic Marriage Equality. One never knows how close an issue is to a person. Such was the case with Riley who shared how emotionally taxing the same sex martial laws were for her parents when it’s seesawed between lawful and unlawful. What was great at this table were the "how to  be a part of the solution" slips which painted scenarios with suggestions on how to respond. I picked up these two: How to remain an ally to the LGBT community—1. Don’t stare at gay couples. It’s disrespectful. 2. If you are a boy, do not assume every gay man likes you. If you are a girl, do not assume every lesbian likes you.

Each student scholar team illustrated the problem, shared its research findings in the surveys conducted this semester (minimally 100 people), fallacies found on the issue (10-20 required which were evenly distributed between both material and formal fallacies), and scholarly and popular research (min. 20 sources). The students were also asked to give visitors something to do (e.g. Abby and Riley), to get involved. Each presentation was to be interactive whether that was the "debt to income predictor" or the analysis of what we ate last night at the Food Desert table. Using the dialectic approach (something students learned this semester) both participants and visitors were changed by the encounter.

Certainly this morning, student enthusiasm and involvement over this past 18 weeks in issues they cared deeply about was contagious.

Sienna, Kapena, Jordan, "Genetically Modified Foods (GMOs)"
The students who spoke about GMOs shared important information about the big corporation Monsanto (Roundup), which is the major producer of genetically modified seeds.  Jordan, a part of the a team with Sienna and Jordan shared startling facts about scientific tests which have shown traces of pesticides in the milk of lactating mothers in both Europe and America, with the higher percentages in the US. We also learned about the big corporations' successful campaigns against food labeling; however, advocates for such disclosure are collecting signatures now to get the bill on California’s ballot. Right now we do not know which plants are genetically modified and which are not. Genetically modified seeds cross pollinate or pollute the fields of non-GMO crops. Those farmers are then sued, because such seeds are patented.

Professor Steve Gerstle a.k.a. "Embedded Librarian"
and City Manager, Jill Keimach
Sienna, Jordan and Kapena with GMO Collage,
Political Billboard Assignment (WLTC)
It was great to see Ms. Jill Keimach, Alameda City Manager, once again. She said she was interested in the student's research and was happy to support them. It was also great to meet a librarian from San Francisco’s City College and another librarian from a Peralta Sister College Tuesday morning. I’d expected to see at least one COA manager, dean, vice president or even Dr. Blake, the president, but none came by to support the students. If the mission of Peralta Community Colleges, and by extension, College of Alameda, is to make education relevant and practical, then the students who presented at the Critical Thinking in Alameda Forum modeled this ideal. Professor Steve Gerstle’s work as an embedded librarian gave these students hands-on instruction and access to tools which made their ability to look at issues important to each of them with depth, discernment, and discretion. Each piece of evidence was weighed and measured against a standard as well as set or vetted against other evidence to see how the material aligned in agreement or disagreement. Students also were asked to make sure that their facts were up to date and that their survey samples were relevant, sufficient and representative.  How many students have the opportunity to create a survey? These students did. In fact one of the students in the current class, Abby, presented a lesson in how to develop questions for a survey. She is transferring this semester.  After the Forum she shared that she is waiting to see which of the colleges and universities she applied to accept her.


Ruitao, Food Deserts Political Poster Assignment
Programs such as this public forum lets the community know how valuable student learning is. When we show up for students, we let them know that their hard work is appreciated, valued and noticed.  When we talk about Student Learning Outcomes in a vacuum, put lives on graphs or show such lives as dots on a curve, the flesh and blood of it– the hours spent in the library in the stacks or on the computer or at home at the kitchen table combing through articles on academic websites like EBSCO is lost. This also does not take into consideration the full-time student who is also working full-time, has elderly parents or siblings to care for, or even the student who suffers the loss of a parent during the semester, but decides to not drop the class as he juggles care for grieving loved ones. What about the student who falls in the shower and then misses three weeks of classes while she is in the hospital? There are other students who are underemployed who get jobs while classes are in session. Not many
Police Brutality Political Poster Assignment (WLTC)
community college students are living at home with a benevolent parent or guardian’s care. There are a few, but the majority of students here choose education because knowledge is a powerful tool no one can take it from them. Students in this Critical Thinking class have developed tools to think and walk logically along a landscape littered with propaganda. They can recognize most landmines (hidden agendas, bias or unfair emotional appeals).  This intellectual, yet practical movement saves limbs and lives as student scholars challenge the dominant narrative with questions. Copyrights do not make falsehoods go away.
Marriage Equality Political Poster Assignment (WLTC)
The critical thinkers guests met at the forum have learned to question everything and agree sparingly without adequate proof in a world which would rather they follow along blindly like the fabled mice.

Foxes? Hedgehogs? Perhaps more a 21st century hybrid, nonetheless, these students above all pursue truth.