Friday, June 14, 2019

Wanda's Picks Radio Show, June 14, 2019

This is a black arts and culture site. We will be exploring the African Diaspora via the writing, performance, both musical and theatrical (film and stage), as well as the visual arts of Africans in the Diaspora and those influenced by these aesthetic forms of expression. I am interested in the political and social ramifications of art on society, specifically movements supported by these artists and their forebearers. It is my claim that the artists are the true revolutionaries, their work honest and filled with raw unedited passion. They are our true heroes. Ashay!
Mrs. Kathy Cotton, director

1.Kathy Cotton, director, "A Place at the Table: African American Pioneers of Silicon Vallery," screening at SFBFF XXI, 12 noon, June 15, at the African American Art and CultureComplex, 762 Fulton Street, SF  http://www.kathycottondigitalstoryteller.com/news


2. Nana Daffuor, SPRINT, June 20-21, 7:30 pm, $15-25 @East Bay Community Space, 507 55th Street, Oakland, CA https://www.sprintmovement.com/performance


Presented by Nana Duffuor and directed by Dazié Rustin Grego-Sykes, Sprint is a powerful stage performance blending film, theater, poetry, music, and dance to tell the coming of age story of Nana—a queer black child of Ghanaian immigrants, discovering herself (and her dignity) in White America.

In the era of #BlackGirlMagic, Sprint begs the critical question: "What happens when magical black girls break?"

Nana Duffour
Based off an original screenplay and collection of written works, Sprint explores the writer’s experiences of anti-blackness and self-denial, sexual violence and self-destruction, healing and resistance. From Nana’s first act of resistance (urinating on the classroom floor of her detested sixth-grade teacher) to the letter she pens to her rapists ten years after the event, Sprint draws on Nana’s most hilarious and at times horrifying life lessons to inspire healing and empowerment.



Charles Curtis Blackwell 

3. Jeff M. Giordano, dir. "THE GOD GIVEN TALENT: THE CREATIVE LIFE OF CHARLES CURTIS BLACKWELL," screening tomorrow, June 15, 12 noon as a part of SFBFF XXI 2019, has been directing independent films since 2004’s "Among Garbage & Flowers". He has interviewed over 80 people for documentary productions. Giordano has completed 4 full-length documentaries. Most recently, "The God Given Talent: The Creative Life of Charles Curtis Blackwell" (2019): the 70 minute-documentary has its World Premiere at the San Francisco Black Film Festival XXI on June 15, 2019. 
Kulu Se Mama's Nephew (1024x1024)
by Charles Curtis Blackwell


Jeff M. Giordano Self-Portrait

In June 2019, Jeff completed a 47-minute documentary: "Making Up My Mind: Searching for Jimmy Lyons" following the musician/writer Jimmy Lyons through an ensemble of interviews. Giordano's next movie will be an Animated Documentary exploring: Individuality, partnerships and Community as it pertains to sexuality and technology: from an ensemble of freshly recorded audio interviews and original animated imagery. Pre-Production has begun.

THE GOD GIVEN TALENT: THE CREATIVE LIFE OF CHARLES CURTIS BLACKWELL

Charles Curtis Blackwell: the Oakland poet, painter, playwright and teacher -- takes us on an intimate journey into his past and present. From his challenging upbringing in both California and Mississippi, to his current creative life, we follow as he discusses loss, love, pain, and redemption -- all through the prism of his artistic endeavors.

Bio for Charles Curtis Blackwell (subject)


Charles Curtis Blackwell is a jazz poet, playwright, performance and visual artist. His published plays and poetry include: Is, the Color of Mississippi Mud, The Fiery Response to Love's Callings, among others.


Blackwell's most recent book is a collection of previously unpublished love poems: Past Fascination (edited by Jeff M. Giordan).

He has also produced three spoken-word albums in collaboration with jazz drummer Billy Toliver, including Catch the First Thing Smokin'.  His paintings/visual art have been been featured in The New York Times and on PBS television. Blackwell has conducted writer's workshops in California prisons such as Folsom and Soledad.

Currently, Charles Curtis Blackwell conducts writer's workshops at Youth Spirit Art Works in Berkeley, CA. There he MC’s ASE: a monthly evening of Poetry, Spoken Word, and Open Mic.


Charles' current project is a poetry-performance play about gospel and the blues -- he's working on getting the play produced for 2020.

Here's the info on Charles upcoming Poetry Reading:


1. Sleepy Cat Books, 2509 Telegraph Ave (a few doors down from Dwight), Berkeley, CA 94704. Charles Curtis Blackwell and Mary Loughran will read at 7 pm on Fri., June 14th, at Sleepy Cat Books, 2509 Telegraph Avenue, as part of the Last Word Reading Series. Book store phone is 925-258-9076. Free.


2. Youth Spirit Artworks Gallery Poetry Series (free), 3324 Adeline close to Alcatraz Avenue. June 22, 7 p.m. Guest Kim Shuck, SF Poet Laureate


http://tobtr.com/s/11379115


Friday, June 07, 2019

Wanda's Picks Radio Show, Friday, June 7, 2019

This is a black arts and culture site. We will be exploring the African Diaspora via the writing, performance, both musical and theatrical (film and stage), as well as the visual arts of Africans in the Diaspora and those influenced by these aesthetic forms of expression. I am interested in the political and social ramifications of art on society, specifically movements supported by these artists and their forebearers. It is my claim that the artists are the true revolutionaries, their work honest and filled with raw unedited passion. They are our true heroes. Ashay!

1. Audrey Candy Corn and Peter Manchini, Directors of the film, "Soar Torian Soar," screening at SFDoc 2019, 6/9/19, 2:30 PM at the Roxie Theatre in SF. Visit sfindie.com

2. William Rhodes, Artists, joins us to ta;lk about  JUKE CITY: A Harlem of the West Immersive Art Experience, June 13, 6-9pm at the African American Art and Culture Complex, 762 Fulton Street; Artist Talk: July 25, 6-9pm at AAACC. 

3. Will Agee, Director, Producer, Cinematographer, Editor, "The Land of High Mountains," at SFDoc, Roxie Theater, 6/9, 12:15 p; 6/11, 7 p   https://www.landofhighmountains.com/

4. Bridgette Auger, Director/DP/Producer, "We Are Not Princesses," at SFDoc, Roxie theater, 6/9, 4:45 p.; 6/13, 7 p http://www.openartfoundation.org/we-are-not-princesses

Music: Zion Trinity, Opening Prayer for Elegba; Amikaeyla Gaston, Lovely Day


Show Link: http://tobtr.com/s/11368807









Wednesday, June 05, 2019

Wanda's Picks Radio, Wed., June 5, 2019

Lavar Munroe with his Gun Dogs at MoAD-SF
Photo: Wanda Sabir
This is a black arts and culture site. We will be exploring the African Diaspora via the writing, performance, both musical and theatrical (film and stage), as well as the visual arts of Africans in the Diaspora and those influenced by these aesthetic forms of expression. I am interested in the political and social ramifications of art on society, specifically movements supported by these artists and their forebearers. It is my claim that the artists are the true revolutionaries, their work honest and filled with raw unedited passion. They are our true heroes. Ashay!

 1. Lavar Munroe, artist from Nassau, Bahamas, joins us to talk about his work in the exhibition: Coffee, Rhum, Sugar and Gold: A Postcolonial Paradox, May 8-Aug. 11, 2019 at the Museum of the African Diaspora in SF. Visit moad-sf.org


Lavar Munroe’s work functions as a reflection of the environment of his upbringing, and draws from memory the crude graffiti on the walls that surrounded his street. Munroe maps a personal journey of survival and trauma in a world of gang violence, drugs, murder, and self-discovery. Though inspired by the past, Munroe’s loud, energetic, and unapologetic visual language confronts contemporary society with the strained and difficult relationship between authority and those who are marginalized and oppressed by systems of power. As well as tapping his own experiences, much of Munroe’s practice comprises research that is informed by critical investigation and theories surrounding mythology and literature. Through his work, Munroe explores several social stereotypes to critique and challenge disparities that cut across gender, race, class, and age.
Lavar Munroe's Red Bone Series at MoAD-SF
Photo: Wanda Sabir
Five of Lavar Munroe’s sculptures from his Gun Dogs series will be on display. Made from cardboard, deconstructed Junkanoo (Bahamian Carnival) costumes, and found toys and objects, Munroe says of these works, “Throughout history, dogs have been used for various reasons ranging from farm work, to slave hunting, to law enforcement and personal protection. The black mind and body have endured extreme trauma in relation to these animals. Gun Dogs also served as the name of a prominent street gang in the Bain and Grants Town area (Nassau, Bahamas) in the late 80s, early 90s. [The dog] identified the menaces and outcasts from society who thrived on the notion of ‘survival by all means.’”
2. San Francisco Black Film Festival XXI, June 13-16 with a special tribute to Jeff Adachi, SF District Attorney, and panel on Prison Reform, June 12. Visit sfbff.org

3. Justin (actor) and Jeffrey Givens (director) join us to talk about their film selection, "Disparity," screening at the Special Tribute on June 12 and again later on in the Festival.

Meet Charlie, he’s white and has been arrested for selling cocaine. Meet Syd he’s black and has  been arrested for crack. Despite being caught with the same drug the disparity in their treatment will open your mind about race and class in the broken u.s justice system.Tag line: Same story, different endings.

4. "Soar Torian Soar" interview with co-directors: Audrey Candy Corn and Peter Menchini. Visit sfindie.org


Music: Meklit and Quinn

Link to show:  http://tobtr.com/s/11368805 

A Review of Soar Torian Soar by Wanda Sabir

"Soar Torian Soar"
“Soar Torian Soar” co-directed by Audrey Candy Corn and Peter Menchini is the story of an active grief ritual. The film chronicles Corn's loss of her eldest son Torian Hughes to violence—a parental rite of passage all too familiar to mothers in Oakland. Heart shattered, Candy Corn's neighbors and friends help her literally sort through Torian's belongings bagged and stacked in the various rooms in the family’s West Oakland home. Sorting through her son's items tells the stories of his first crush, wish for a brother granted and photos reflecting the care he took of his siblings and the great affection he had for mom. Corn shares her parenting values and the degree to which these values countered, even cushioned what her three boys, the eldest, Torian Hughes, a casualty of that contradiction, experience daily.  

In a recent interview co-directors, Corn and Menchini talk about the decision to not just document her journey which continues, but share the personal work with a larger community. Corn says that she is now inducted into a “sea of grieving mothers” populated by the descendants along a familiar ancestral route. At her son's killers trial her attorney offered the youth a deal which would have shaved 35 years off his sentence. His attorney refused. Now the 22 year old is facing up to 60 years.

The screening, Sunday, June 9, 2:30 pm at the Roxie Theater, 3117 16th Street, in San Francisco, as a part of the 16th Annual SF Documentary Film Festival through June 13 there will be a community forum afterward with a panel including directors moderated by Otis Taylor. Visit sfindie.com

Torian Hughes’s flesh reminds one of Emmett Till’s body and his mother, Mamie Elizabeth Till Mobley decision to grieve in public her son’s brutal killing. The log line for “Soar Torian Soar” is “It Takes a Community to Heal. Aché.”  While Till’s death became the catalyst for a rumbling sparked a revolutionary movement when African America saw visually what hatred of black people produced, Money, Mississippi, August 28, 1955 emblematic racial injustice, Torian’s death is the other side of the loss. It is what this mother, these brothers, this community, need to do to heal. Corn shows viscerally what it means to lose a child. We never really know how the loss feels in Mobley’s body, how her son’s death shows up in her inability to function and who is there to help her.

The co-directors meet at a protest on Valentine’s Day. Corn had been video documenting her various feelings about her son’s death. The plan grew from making a personal document to remember Torian to this public statement from “a grieving, yet a breathing mother,” a phrase Corn coins.

She says, “What I have faced and the trauma that I'm dealing with is something that I'll be dealing with the rest of my life. Although my story is unique, it is very similar— I have inherited a sea of grieving mothers. Unfortunately, the beauty of it is through the pain the 'Soar Torian Soar' short documentary film was birthed. ‘Soar Torian Soar’ is a part of my healing. I'm continuing to be in the struggle with everyday waking up being reminded that I am a current mother of two remaining surviving male children who are current targets, and it's not because of them being menaces to society. It is because I've done everything that society is asked me to do and now it is time for the community to pour in. You know, you have to be the change that you want to see.”
“We agreed [implicitly] that this film would just be very honest and very present and that we would pull no punches,” Peter Menchini states, “but also to have no melodrama and nothing fortuitous and that it wouldn't drag anything out, but on the other hand, it would not shut down a mother's grief that would not silence her voice.”

Listen to an interview with directors: http://tobtr.com/s/11358835 

The San Francisco Black Film Festival XXI Tribute to Jeff Adachi By Wanda Sabir

(L-R) Yoko Coleman, Brett Harrison, S.F. Mayor London Breed, Jim Chabin, Kali O’Ray.
Photo credit: William Hammons


The San Francisco Black Film Festival opens its 21st Anniversary Season this year, June 13-16, with a media preview, briefing and tribute, June 12, 4-6 p.m. to the late Jeff Adachi, San Francisco Public Defender and filmmaker. Kali O'Ray and Katera Crossley, SFBFF Festival Co-Directors want to honor a friend to the festival, whose work: “America Needs A Racial Facial” debuted in 2016. Jacq Wilson, the brother of Jacque Wilson who worked with Jeff Adachi in the Public Defender’s Office, will be a part of the prison reform panel. Oher panelists include: CA State Senator Nancy Skinner (Invited-Author of SB 1437); Attorney Jacq Wilson; Supreme Court-Winning Civil Rights Attorney Pamela Price and Former PUC Judge Karen Clopton.

There will be two short films that evening, “Disparity: A Tale Of 2 Pushaz,” dir. Justin Givens. Givens’ film challenges the uneven and unfair mandatory sentencing laws for crack vs. powder cocaine. The director said that he became interested in the topic while at Arizona State College completing a degree in criminal justice and noticed how many people are serving lengthy sentences based on race. In the film one character, Charlie, is convicted and sentenced based on his race not the crime. In fact, the town where Syd lives the majority of his customers are white. The tag line is: Same story, different endings.

When Attorney General Eric Holder changed federal laws around sentencing mandates for crack vs. powder cocaine, Black community cheered. The Fair Sentencing Act (2010) ended mandatory sentencing and the 2018 First Step Act expands job training and other programming aimed at reducing recidivism rates among federal prisoners; however, for the majority of prisoners in this nation in state prisons these efforts to reduce mass incarceration do not affect them.
Another film that evening looks at State Senator Nancy Skinner's SB 1437, the bill that made it possible for Neko Wilson’s release after spending nearly a decade in jail for a murder he did not commit.  Wilson is the first Californian freed by SB 1437. However, as of May 2019, his release has been challenged. There are lawmakers who want him sent back to jail.

With the settlement with San Francisco City and County for the shooting death of Mario Woods by SF Police Officers, once again, SFBFF programming addresses issues that face its constituency. Along with Justin Givens’ film will be screened the short documentary "Neko Wilson, Social Biography" by Raj Jayadev & Silicon Valley DeBug.

The tribute and briefing June 12, 2019 @ Cinemark Theatres, 845 Mission Street (across from the 5th and Market Garage) is guaranteed to inspire dialogue which is what SFBFF is known for—programming that “serves as a vehicle to initiate dialogue on the important issues of our times to lead to a better understanding of and communication between, peoples of diverse cultures, races, and lifestyles.” 

This year there are short and feature length films covering a range of topic reflective of the diversity that is Pan African Diaspora. The venues are within walking distance of one another in the Fillmore community. Tickets are just a click away. Visit www.sfbff.org  The media briefing and screening are free with RSVP at the website where patrons can watch trailers. This year SFBFF is introducing the Urban Pitch Fest, an opportunity for Urban Storytellers to pitch their stories (Movies, Television Programs, etc.) to Industry Professionals. The new partnership with The Advanced Imaging Society, will help to ensure the right people are in the room. Listen to Wanda’s Picks Radio June 5, 2019 for an interview with SFBFF co-directors.












Saturday, June 01, 2019

Flyway Productions's The Wait Room a review/reflection Take 2


Flyway Productions's The Wait Room, which premiered in San Francisco April 19-27, and May 17-18 in Richmond, looks at the effects of incarceration on family members left behind, specifically women. Jo Kreiter, director, choreographer of the work brought in collaborators from ESSIE Justice to provide stories which Pamela Z then mixed with music to create a literal landscape wherein dancers performing on a tilting set shifting both by the weight of dancers flying as well as other dancers moving the set on its axis. The Wait Room was quite remarkable especially opening night as in climate weather pushed both dancers, choreographer,m designers and audience close to its collective edges. I wasn't the only person seated on the edge of her seat.

Bianca Cabrera, Clarissa Dyas, Laura Elaine Ellis, Sonsherée Giles, MaryStarr Hope,
and Megan Lowe.
Photo credit: Austin Forbord
Laura Elaine Ellis, Sonsherée Giles, Clarissa Dyas, Megan Lowe
photo credit: Austin Forbord
Kreiter's reflective choreography stayed in conversation the entire length of the work as dancers' explored in text and form the difficulties inherent in an imagined carceral structure. The somatic dissonance these women and children experience daily communicated in the flying broken falls frozen attempts at embrace-- what happens when a person loses a loved one or a loved one taken away, out of touch beyond their physical reach? On both sides of the aisle, cell, room, children, wives, sisters, aunts, cousins, friends, allies -- wait.  The audience listens to the clock tick. . . as we all wait to the score repeats the refrain between movements: "And so you're waiting, waiting hours, 2-3 days, it felt like forever. . . . I showed up visiting him. I didn't know the rules. I would try going once a week. it's 400 miles. The process of getting to him. It made me so uncomfortable. I remember holding my breath. So much nervousness. And so you're waiting. No, you can't go in. No. You can wear those pants. My dad's hand was on the other side of the glass. I didn't know the rules and they change between visits."
It was a cold night in San Francisco. All my invited friends canceled that evening to join me. I nodded understandably as the winds blew threw my thin lining. However, once the performance began, the stories the artists told across a landscape that is visceral and emotional and caustic all at once, I'd like to say, I became a bit warmer-- nope (smile). It even started to mist. Jo said she came really close to canceling opening night, but I am happy she didn't. As the sun set in the distance, dancers sat in chairs, some high on the pole which was the center of the clock which ticked . . . time a casualty in a war where race, gender and economics convict certain babies before birth. All of a sudden, the captive mother who throws herself over the side of the slave ship is understood. She refuses to sit lie stay bound to uncertainty. The weight destroys happiness and joy. New life is a weight she cannot fathom-- the unknown too much to contemplate. Waiting Room? What will the pronouncement be?

In Pamela Z's score women speak of not being about being turned away after traveling so far to 
see their loved one. Other women share special moments once the wait is over and they are in the visiting room. Sentencing is not singular. It affects the person taken from home and his or her family too. Kreiter's The Wait Room shares stories of consolidated loss capitalized: individual, family, 
Clarissa Dyasphoto credit: Austin Forbord
community, nation, yet, Clarissa Dyas's flight in the last movement reflects both defiance and strength. These women who wait are not going to give up or give over their loved ones.

The performance was across the street from UN Plaza in San Francisco, then moved to Richmond, California. It heads to New York September 20, where it will be performed outside Sing Sing Prison. The Wait Room, a site specific dance honoring women with incarcerated loved ones is part 1 of The Decarceration Trilogy: Dismantling the Prison Industrial Complex One Dance at a Time.. It is also, Jo says, her most intimate work to date, as it explores a private aspect of her life. She also spent many years as a woman who "waited."  The marvelous dancers are  Bianca Cabrera, Clarissa Dyas, Laura Elaine Ellis, Sonsherée Giles, MaryStarr Hope, Megan Lowe with Lighting Designer: Jack Beuttler  and Costume Designer: Jamielyn Duggan. 

Listen to three interviews: 1. Jo Kreiter;  2. Jo with Laura Elaine Ellis (dancer), Catalina "Caty" Palacios and Tanea Lunsford Lynx, members, ESSIE Justice; and 3. with the creative team, Pamela Z and Sean Riley. 

Flyaway Production in partnership with Essie Justice Group presents: Part One of the Decarceration Trilogy: The Wait Room

Jo Kreiter's company Flyaway Production, presents: The Wait Room, Part One of her Decarceration Trilogy opened on a chilly, San Francisco evening ground zero for disenfranchised and disillusioned. So many people moving to and fro-- shuffled from one end of Market Street to another, their wares a body -- somebody's body illegitimate, illegal displaced lost.

The late poet, Sekou Sundiata wrote about the illegitimacy of flesh, people who occupy this skin: ‘Somebody-body-body-body-body-body-body-body-body-body-body-body-body-body-body-body-body-body-body-body-body-body-body-body-body-body-body had to stop you. I watch the news. You always lose. You’re unreliable. That’s undeniable. You’re dangerous. You’re dangerous. You’re unreliable. You’re on the news. You always lose.’ I could wake up in the mornin’ and without warnin’ my world could change. Blink your eyes. All depends on the skin, all depends on the skin you’re livin’ in." I could add, all depends on how much money in your pocket and if you have a place to rest your head.

The Wait Room is performed just next door to ACT's Strand Theatre, the alley is fenced off, but there is a doorway with a table where volunteers hand out free tickets. Inside there is a stage which is lit. A clock on its back . . . chairs bolted to the surface, a center pole with rope, another chair placed midway up and then there is a chair that moves. 

Stadium seating surrounds the stage. Center stage back row is the best seat in the house, however, all the seats, particularly the last rows are best.

The story is one of women and girls who have loved ones in prison or jail. Their voices are a part of Pamela Z's soundtrack--the chorus clock ticking and the words "we're waiting." Women and girls talk about the visiting room, but mostly about the indignity they suffer to see their sons, fathers, brothers, husbands. I don't recall stories about visiting mothers or sisters or daughters. Although, such stories exist and this is part 1 of a larger work.


The six dancers take the audience through seven scenes: Visiting, Father, Partner, Son; Economics; Race; Shame; Change; This is a Love Story.

My favorite parts were the Economics, Race and This is a Love Story. The dancers push the stage around; however, the dancer on the stage makes it tilt from side to side and as it moved dancers would fly from one side to another, using a chair as a meridian or landmark in an uncertain future-- And so we wait.

The waiting is a place of vulnerability and powerlessness as is the entire visiting process. Women talk about the invasive body searches they undergo to visit, the cost of phone calls and commissary. No bargaining with the Department of Corrections, families pay the exorbitant prices or their loved one goes without.

Certain gestures are repeated like the counting on fingers. . . the passage of time as one waits, hands hitting palms like Rock Paper Scissors. The desire to visit overrides the indignity. Just listening to women who are denied a visit because a bra has underwire, a child because she is wearing shorts. Women talk about the distance traveled only to be sent home. A child talks about her visit to see her father.

I needed to see the work again to be more conversant about the composition; however, I didn't make it back to SF or Richmond. Hum, maybe I will catch it at Sing Sing (smile).


Listen to three interviews: 1. Jo Kreiter;  2. Jo with Laura Elaine Ellis (dancer), Catalina "Caty" Palacios and Tanea Lunsford Lynx, members, ESSIE Justice; and 3. with the creative team, Pamela Z and Sean Riley. 


Watch this video exceprt from The Wait Room

Friday, May 31, 2019

Wanda's Picks Radio Show, May 31, 2019

Linda Steel II
photo: 
Jason Lam
This is a black arts and culture site. We will be exploring the African Diaspora via the writing, performance, both musical and theatrical (film and stage), as well as the visual arts of Africans in the Diaspora and those influenced by these aesthetic forms of expression. I am interested in the political and social ramifications of art on society, specifically movements supported by these artists and their forebearers. It is my claim that the artists are the true revolutionaries, their work honest and filled with raw unedited passion. They are our true heroes. Ashay!

1. East Bay Dances, hosted by Oakland Ballet Company, features among others, dancer, choreographer, Linda Steele II, who is a improvisational dance artist and creator, formally trained at Marin Ballet and Marin School of the Arts before receiving her BFA from Dominican University of CA where she also studied Art History. She has been honored to have performed original works by Alonzo King, Drew Jacoby, Maurya Kerr's tinypistol, Sidra Bell, Katie Faulkner and recently with Joslynn Mathis Reed, Urban Jazz Dance Company, Dazaun Soleyn, Kendra Kimbrough Dance Ensemble, .fLEE dances and Capacitor Dance, among others.

Linda Steele II has presented her solo work in various dance festivals and art events including the renowned Ebony Fashion Fair. She has studied and choreographed Dance for Film with MADE in France and has performed internationally with Anandha Ray's Quimera Tribe, Urban Jazz Dance Co, Corina Kinnear and others. She is deeply grateful to have met and collaborated with such amazing artists.

East Bay DANCES
Hosted by Oakland Ballet
Sunday June 2, 2019
4pm
Laney College
Odell  Johnson Theater
900 Fallon St. (across from Lake Merritt BART)

Tickets
$25 adults
$20 seniors
$15 children and students


2. Jackie Wright joins us to talk about the 21st Annual San Francisco Black Film Festival, June 12 (preview) to June 16, 2019 Visit https://sfbff.org/wordpress/official-selections-2019


3. Juneteenth 2019 in Oakland
Wanda Ravernell, Executive Director is the visionary of Omnira Institute and promoter and manager for Awon Ohun Omnira, (Voices of Freedom) and serves as the narrator for its performances. She has been the administrator and booking agent as well as the publicist for all of its activities.
  
A former journalist who worked for 20 years in the newspaper business at the Alameda Newspaper Group, the Sacramento Bee and The San Francisco Chronicle, she also was an activist for minority journalists including developing and implementing a workshop for minority high school journalists. From 2003 to the present, Ravernell developed and implemented a Juneteenth ritual commemorating the Emancipation Proclamation using that included all the faiths of the captives who would become slaves during the Slave Trade Era.

Beginning in 2009 to the present, Ravernell developed and implemented several lecture demonstrations drawing on the African traditional knowledge and applied it to African American history using a choir comprised members of an African American church and the Lucumi community, who also provided the musical framework and expertise of the sacred drum tradition known as Bata. The choir, Awon Ohun Omnira (Voices of Freedom) received the 2010 Negro Spirituals Heritage Award from the Friends of Negro Spirituals, a nonprofit dedicated to the preservation of the music.

In 2015, through Ravernell, the institute received a Certificate of Recognition from California State Assemblyman Nate Thurmond.  In 2014, Ravernell with Sauda Burch led the institute in developing and staging the first Black-Eyed Pea Festival, held in Oakland’s Mosswood Park. Concerned about the impact of the deaths of young, black men and women at the hands of the police, Ravernell, with Dennis Toabji Stewart, decided to bring healing through traditional music to the surviving families. They have worked with Cephus “Uncle Bobby” Johnson, the uncle of Oscar Grant who was killed by BART police in 2009 and Phelicia Jones with The Justice for Mario Woods campaign. Woods was killed by S.F. Police in 2015.  Visit omnirainstitute.org



Kathy Lynn "Kanika" Marshall
Michael Fitzwater Photography









   
4. Kanika Marshall, author, artist featured in the Sac Black Book Festival, May 31-June 1, 2019 https://www.kanikamarshall.com/mbr_bio.php

Kurt Edward Fishback chose Kanika Marshall
to be a part of his tribute to women artists.

Wednesday, May 29, 2019

Wanda's Picks Radio Show, May 29, 2019

This is a black arts and culture site. We will be exploring the African Diaspora via the writing, performance, both musical and theatrical (film and stage), as well as the visual arts of Africans in the Diaspora and those influenced by these aesthetic forms of expression. I am interested in the political and social ramifications of art on society, specifically movements supported by these artists and their forebearers. It is my claim that the artists are the true revolutionaries, their work honest and filled with raw unedited passion. They are our true heroes. Ashay!


1. Alma Robinson, Executive Director of California Lawyers for the Arts










2. Cassidy Friedman and Eric Butler's "Circles" screening at SF Indie Doc Fest selection, Sat., May 1, 2:30 at the Roxie & Monday, June 3, 9 p.m. (Roxie), sfindie.com

https://www.circlesmovie.com/



3. Abdul Kenyatta, Speakeasy Storyteller Cafe  at

SFIAF, 9:00 p.m., Friday, May 31, 2019, and https://www.facebook.com/abdul.kenyatta

Friday, May 24, 2019

Wanda's Picks Radio Show, Friday, May 24, 2019

This is a black arts and culture site. We will be exploring the African Diaspora via the writing, performance, both musical and theatrical (film and stage), as well as the visual arts of Africans in the Diaspora and those influenced by these aesthetic forms of expression. I am interested in the political and social ramifications of art on society, specifically movements supported by these artists and their forebearers. It is my claim that the artists are the true revolutionaries, their work honest and filled with raw unedited passion. They are our true heroes. Ashay!

1. Chris Metzler, Associate Director of Programming, DocFest, 18th SF Doc Fest May 29-June 13, 2019 https://sfindie.com/


3. Faye Wilson Kennedy, Sacramento Black Book Festival, May 31-June 1
https://www.sacramentoblackbookfair.com/