Friday, March 12, 2021

Wanda's Picks Radio Show, Friday, March 12, 2021

 This is a black arts and culture site. We will be exploring the African Diaspora via the writing, performance, both musical and theatrical (film and stage), as well as the visual arts of Africans in the Diaspora and those influenced by these aesthetic forms of expression. I am interested in the political and social ramifications of art on society, specifically movements supported by these artists and their forebearers. It is my claim that the artists are the true revolutionaries, their work honest and filled with raw unedited passion. They are our true heroes. Ashay! 



1. Zakiyyah G.E. Capehart joins us to celebrate her new book: Ghana on My Mind with special guest, Bryant Bolling. 

2. Christine Joy Amagn Ferrer (a.k.a. Tine) joins us to talk about "The Divine Coloring Book."  

3. Archived show March 3, 2021 and features: Steve Fiffer who speaks about his book,  It's In the Action: Memories of a Nonviolence Warrior (March 2021), co-written by the late Rev. Dr. CT Vivian; followed by Women's Voices Now Film Festival: Ariane Thielenhaus, diretor of programs; Natalie Cook, dir., "Backwards God;" Alyscia Cunningham, dir./prod., "I Am More Than My Hair"; Ingrid Rogers, "Liberate," writer and performer.

We close the archived show with Mahasin D. Shamsid-Deen, playwright, "Carrying the Load . . . the life and times of Sister Clara Muhammad." (Feb. 27-March 21). 


To listen: http://tobtr.com/s/11910430

Friday, February 19, 2021

Wanda's Picks Radio Show, Friday, February 19, 2021

This is a black arts and culture site. We will be exploring the African Diaspora via the writing, performance, both musical and theatrical (film and stage), as well as the visual arts of Africans in the Diaspora and those influenced by these aesthetic forms of expression. I am interested in the political and social ramifications of art on society, specifically movements supported by these artists and their forebearers. It is my claim that the artists are the true revolutionaries, their work honest and filled with raw unedited passion. They are our true heroes. Ashay! 


1. Del Sol founder Charlton Lee with Genny Lim, featured poet at Sat., Feb. 20, 6-7:30 p.m. concert

Free Del Sol concerts on Sunday, Feb. 21:

1:30 pm at the Bandstand in Lake Merritt.  

3:00 pm at Cordonices Park in Berkeley near the slide.


2. Stephanie Ann Johnson, Ph.D. joins us to talk about her work up at Oakland Theater Project through March 6. 

3. We close with a conversation with David Johnson, poet, activist, journalist, historian, to talk about El Hajj Malik El Shabazz. 
Del Sol founder Carlton Lee with Genny Lim, featured poet at Sat., Feb. 20, concert


Stephanie Ann Johnson, Ph.D. joins us to talk about her work up at Oakland Theater Project through March 6. 

We close with a conversation with David Johnson, co-founder of Umbra and the Black Arts Movement, poet, activist, journalist, historian, to talk about El Hajj Malik El Shabazz. 

David Henderson was connected to the Black Arts Movement through the Umbra Workshop, where he served as an editor of their magazine and editor of the three Umbra anthologies. De Mayor of Harlem and Neo-California are his best-known books of poetry. He has read a selection of his poetry for the permanent archives of the Library of Congress. Author of the lyrics to Sun Ra's composition “Love in Outerspace,” he h also recorded with the saxophonists and composers Ornette Coleman and David Murray and the cornetist and composer Butch Morris.
Author of the biography ’Scuse Me While I Kiss the Sky. Jimi Hendrix: Voodoo Child, he wrote and produced an award-winning two-hour documentary on the African American Beat poet Bob Kaufman for National Public Radio and Pacifica Radio, which inspired a critically acclaimed film, And When I Die I Won’t Stay Dead, directed by Billy Woodberry.

Was a poet-in-residence at The City College of New York, he has taught in CUNY’s SEEK Program and has been a visiting professor at the University of California, Berkeley; UC San Diego; the State University of New York at Stony Brook; and Wesleyan University. Most recently he became the first Fellow of the Lost and Found Poetics Initiative out of the Center for the Humanities at CUNY’s Graduate Center, New York

David Henderson was connected to the Black Arts Movement through the Umbra Workshop, where he served as an editor of their magazine and editor of the three Umbra anthologies. De Mayor of Harlem and Neo-California are his best-known books of poetry. He has read a selection of his poetry for the permanent archives of the Library of Congress. Author of the lyrics to Sun Ra's composition “Love in Outerspace,” he h also recorded with the saxophonists and composers Ornette Coleman and David Murray and the cornetist and composer Butch Morris.
Author of the biography ’Scuse Me While I Kiss the Sky. Jimi Hendrix: Voodoo Child, he wrote and produced an award-winning two-hour documentary on the African American Beat poet Bob Kaufman for National Public Radio and Pacifica Radio, which inspired a critically acclaimed film, And When I Die I Won’t Stay Dead, directed by Billy Woodberry.

Was a poet-in-residence at The City College of New York, he has taught in CUNY’s SEEK Program and has been a visiting professor at the University of California, Berkeley; UC San Diego; the State University of New York at Stony Brook; and Wesleyan University. Most recently he became the first Fellow of the Lost and Found Poetics Initiative out of the Center for the Humanities at CUNY’s Graduate Center, New York.


Music: Kerwin Young's In the Amazon; Kahil El Zabar & Archie Shepp's Brother Malcolm.

Show linkhttp://tobtr.com/11896012

Friday, January 29, 2021

Wanda's Picks Radio Show, Friday, January 29, 2021

 This is a black arts and culture site. We will be exploring the African Diaspora via the writing, performance, both musical and theatrical (film and stage), as well as the visual arts of Africans in the Diaspora and those influenced by these aesthetic forms of expression. I am interested in the political and social ramifications of art on society, specifically movements supported by these artists and their forebearers. It is my claim that the artists are the true revolutionaries, their work honest and filled with raw unedited passion. They are our true heroes. Ashay! 

1. Lisa Goshon is the President of LGI Branding Inc. and the first minority-woman in the U.S. to manufacture N95 surgical-grade face mask.  She’s also the pioneer of the patented biometric authentication 2-way exchange software called “PECX” and founder of the Black Women of COVID Alliance.  Lisa resides in Southern California.

Nikcole Cunningham is an adoption social worker for Department of Human Services in San Francisco, California where she supports families with mental health services and ongoing difficult issues.  

1. Lisa Goshon is the President of LGI Branding Inc. and the first minority-woman in the U.S. to manufacture N95 surgical-grade face mask.  She’s also the pioneer of the patented biometric authentication 2-way exchange software called “PECX” and founder of the Black Women of COVID Alliance.  Lisa resides in Southern California.

Nikcole Cunningham is an adoption social worker for Department of Human Services in San Francisco, California where she supports families with mental health services and ongoing difficult issues.  

2. Watershed Environmental Poetry Festival is this weekend, Jan. 30-31. We are joined by Joyce Jenkins, editor, Poetry Flash and Kim Shuck, SF Poet Laureate to talk about this event. PoetryFlash.org

Kim Shuck was born in San Francisco, California, and is a member of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma. She received a BA in Art and an MFA in Textiles from San Francisco State University. Shuck is the author of Deer Trails, from City Lights Books, 2019), Clouds Running In (Taurean Horn Press, 2014), Rabbit Stories (Poetic Matrix Press, 2013), and Smuggling Cherokee (Greenfield Review Press, 2005), as well as of the chapbook collection Sidewalk Ndn (FootHills Press, 2018). In 2019, Shuck was named an Academy of American Poets Laureate Fellow and awarded a PEN Oakland Censorship Award. In 2020 she received the NCBR Groundbreaker Award. She served as the Poet Laureate of San Francisco, 2017-2020.

Joyce Jenkins is Editor and Director of Poetry Flash, Literary Review (Poetryflash.org), presenter of the Poetry Flash Reading Series, Northern California Book Awards, and Watershed Environmental Poetry Festival. Her poems have appeared in Ambush Review, ZYZZYVA, Addison Street Anthology: Berkeley’s Poetry Walk, The Place That Inhabits Us: Poems of the San Francisco Watershed, and elsewhere. She is the author of Joy Road, a chapbook, and Portal, introduction by Carolyn Kizer.

Kudos include the American Book Award 1994, National Poetry Association’s Distinguished Service to Poets & Poetry Award 1995, and PEN Oakland Josephine Miles Lifetime Achievement Award 2006. A City of Berkeley day was proclaimed for her in honor of the Berkeley Poetry Festival Lifetime Achievement Award 2009. Poetry Flash received Litquake’s Barbary Coast Award in 2012.

Link: http://tobtr.com/s/11887157

Wednesday, December 23, 2020

Wanda's Picks Radio Show, Dec. 23, 2020

This is a black arts and culture site. We will be exploring the African Diaspora via the writing, performance, both musical and theatrical (film and stage), as well as the visual arts of Africans in the Diaspora and those influenced by these aesthetic forms of expression. I am interested in the political and social ramifications of art on society, specifically movements supported by these artists and their forebearers. It is my claim that the artists are the true revolutionaries, their work honest and filled with raw unedited passion. They are our true heroes. Ashay!

Today we speak to co-editors of Colossus: HOME (2020), Sara Biel and Karla Brundage colossuspress.org Sara Biel is a poet, visual artist, and social worker. Her work combines original text with different art materials. She is passionate about collaborative art and performance processes, and focuses on art as a medium for building

community. Sara’s work has been featured in Oakland’s Moondrop productions and sPARKLE & bLINK. She is the editor of Colossus: Bay Area Poets Challenge Immigration Injustice, Sara and Karla Brundage collaboratively edited Colossus:Home Karla Brundage is a Bay Area based poet, activist, and educator. Born in Berkeley, California in the summer of love to a Black mother and white father, Karla spent most of her childhood in Hawaii where she developed a deep love of nature. She is a Pushcart Prize nominee and the founder of West Oakland to West Africa Poetry Exchange (WO2WA) and is a board member of the Before Columbus Foundation.
http://westoaklandtowestafrica.com/ as well as on https://www.karlabrundage.com/






















2. Silicon Valley Dance Festival rebroadcast 

Music: Zion Trinity; Imani Coppola

Wanda's Picks Radio Show, Dec. 23, 2020

Friday, December 04, 2020

Wanda's Picks Radio Show, Friday, Dec. 5, 2020

 This is a black arts and culture site. We will be exploring the African Diaspora via the writing, performance, both musical and theatrical (film and stage), as well as the visual arts of Africans in the Diaspora and those influenced by these aesthetic forms of expression. I am interested in the political and social ramifications of art on society, specifically movements supported by these artists and their forebearers. It is my claim that the artists are the true revolutionaries, their work honest and filled with raw unedited passion. They are our true heroes. Ashay! 

1. Min. Imhotep Alkebulan, founding member, Wo'se Community Church (1987). Senior Minister of Wo'se Sacramento..

2. Demetri Broxton is the Senior Director of Education at Museum of the African Diaspora (MoAD) in San Francisco, CA. An Oakland native, Broxton has over 19 years of experience working in the field of education and the arts. At MoAD, he leads the education programs that enhance the visitor experience at the Museum. His department’s mission is to connect youth, educators, and the public to the historical, cultural, and intellectual contributions of the worldwide African Diaspora. Outside of his role at MoAD, Demetri is an independent curator and practicing artist. He served as a curator for the City of Berkeley (2013-2020) and his artwork is represented by Patricia Sweetow Gallery in San Francisco. Broxton holds an M.A. in Museum Studies from San Francisco State University (2010) and a BFA from UC Berkeley in Art Practice (2002).

3. Baba Opesanwo Ifakorede Fadairo, Alagbigba Babalawo joins us to talk about ancestors and his work with herbs and nutrition as medicine (winter season)

4. Riddim Doctors: Val Serrant and Sikiru Adepoju

Thursday, November 26, 2020

Wanda's Picks Radio Show, Nov. 25, 2020

This is a black arts and culture site. We will be exploring the African Diaspora via the writing, performance, both musical and theatrical (film and stage), as well as the visual arts of Africans in the Diaspora and those influenced by these aesthetic forms of expression. I am interested in the political and social ramifications of art on society, specifically movements supported by these artists and their forebearers. It is my claim that the artists are the true revolutionaries, their work honest and filled with raw unedited passion. They are our true heroes. Ashay! 

We begin with a show aired Nov. 26, 2008 featuring Rafael Jesus Gonzalez and Karla Brundage. We 
speak about Indigenous Rights and being Thankful.
 



We close with another show, first aired April 28, 2009. Today's show features: director, Tim Disney and subject, Regina N. Kelly, of the new film, "American Violet," which opens in the San Francisco Bay Area, Friday, May 1, 2009. There is a free screening Tuesday, April 28, 7 p.m. at the Metreon (4th and Mission Streets, San Francisco, 3rd level).


Our next guest is Jean Marie Teno, director of the new film, "Sacred Places," which looks at African Cinema and the FESPACO film festival on its 40th anniversary and questions its goals and objectives. The film screens several times at the San Francisco International Film Festival.

We close with an extended interview with Hon. Dr. Ra Un Nefer Amen 1, D.D., spiritual leader and founder of the Ausar Auset community, and author of the new novel: "Heru: The Resurrection."


Monday, November 09, 2020

Centennial Year

 Amos Tutuola, author of My Life in the Bush of Ghosts, would have been 100 this year, June 20. Born in Abeokuta, Nigeria, his work translates the experience of Africans in the Diapora through kidnap and enslavement resonates strongly today as the country speaks openly about presistence trauma as more and more sites are marked and the political and economic legacy attached to Black bodies is ennumerated. Governor Gavin Nusome signed bill to develop a team to investigate slavery's legacy in California and how the state could address the impact of ensalvement on its resident descendents. This with the push for the federal govenrment to enact the HR40 bill would make the work of N'COBRA finally a reality.  The timing is perfect given the recent Pan African Federalist Conference which is looking at organizing discussion across the regions here in North America, insluding Canada, as other regions host similar meetings to discuss and develop plans to shape this new nation, United African States by 2030. 

With Kamala Harris in such a powerful position, Bay Area born and raised, the potential for institutional change is perhaps more imminent than with predessessors. Who would have imagined first a Black man as president and then his vice president selecting a Black woman as his running mate. Pretty amzing. Pretty encouraging. The Howard University graduate is a woman with swag as she carries her African and South Asian ancestors legacies proudly. She was raised as a Black woman. It was an intentional choice her mother made. 

When I think about this year, also the centennial year for  Mrs.Henrietta Lacks, born August 1, 1920, the women best known for her immortal cells called HeLa. Take without permission from her body. When she died at 30 from uterine cancer, the cells extracted stayed alive and kept growing to the point that HeLa cells are everywhere. They dominate the research and have led to numerous cures for many diseases. John Hopkins sould rename a wing for her and the next postage stamp should bear her image and name. 

Lastly, I want to remember, Ms. Beah Richards, born July 12, 1920 in Vicksburg, Virginia, she had to leave town so would get killed, she was that outspoken. Racism was something she could not overlook or live with so her mom sent her to California after a time at Dillard University was unsatisfactory. She wasn't happy with the classicim there.  Her classic poem,